How to Make Your Screenplay Unique

Writers want to create a story so good that people will remember it long after they’ve finished reading the script or watching the play.

Good writing skills
Because they are pressured to deliver something, many screenplay writers reach out for the tricks they know work every time: clichés.

(Newswire.net — January 10, 2018) — Every writer has big dreams for their screenplay. They want to create a story so good that people will remember it long after they’ve finished reading the script or watching the play. They plan to develop a unique storyline with rounded characters, and unexpected twists.

So, why do so many fail to deliver an original piece?

Is it because they lack imagination? Do they need to work on their skills? Or is it just pure laziness?

More often than not, the problem is that screenplay writers don’t have the time they need to create outstanding pieces. Here’s the thing: great writing takes time. Sure, you can force yourself to sit for two hours straight at your desk and work on your play, but that doesn’t mean you’ll necessarily get something good. Sometimes, ideas don’t occur when you want them to, but during the most unexpected moments, such as when taking a shower or going for a walk.

Because they are pressured to deliver something, many screenplay writers reach out for the tricks they know work every time: clichés.

In this article, we’ll look at some strategies that can help you avoid stereotype writing.

Ask the Right Question

Before anything, sit down and ask yourself a bunch of questions about the story, your main character, the theme, and so on.

What motivates your protagonist? How will they achieve their goals? What should they learn in the process? Who else is involved in the process and why?

Keep in mind, though that while you may know the answers to these questions, your character is still trying to figure them out. Your audience shouldn’t feel as if the protagonist knows where they’re going and has nothing to learn in the process because they know everything already. Make them discover the answers one by one by advancing the plot.

Force Your Protagonist to Choose Between Two Options

One of the most important things that could drag your play is a protagonist that is too vague or bland to carry the story. Because the main character is underdeveloped, people have a difficult time relating to them and investing in their journey.

One simple way to fix this problem is to have your protagonist choose between two options with clear consequences. It doesn’t matter if the decision is right or wrong – it’s just a way to let the audience know if they identify with the character’s choice and how much they’ll invest in their development.

State Your Protagonist’s Goals Clearly

No script writing service wants to display the message of their play from the very beginning. They want the audience to discover it and be surprised by its meaning. The problem is that a lot of screenplay writers tend to get too vague and confuse or bore their audience instead of wowing them.

Here’s an example. You were so preoccupied with being subtle that you neglected to communicate your protagonist’s goals in Act I. As such, the narrative in Act II that should lead to the climax, feels aimless and out of place. Your audience can’t understand why your character is behaving the way he does or why he is taking certain decisions. Because they have no clear sense of what is happening and where you are taking them, the second act often feels long and pointless to your audience.

To avoid this mistake, state your main character’s goals at the beginning of Act II. You don’t necessarily need to include them in your screenplay. But, this simple trick can help you explain better to your audience why the protagonist does the things he does.

Create a False Ending

You’ve created an interesting first act that presented the setting, the characters, and their motivations; you’ve forced them to make difficult decisions, and you’ve developed the story carefully, without burning any important steps or confusing your audience. But, how can you keep them hooked until the climax and big finale?

One excellent way to do so is by creating a false ending.

Make your audience believe that the movie is about to end. Have your protagonist behave as if they have achieved their goals and resolved any conflict. Then, when they least expect, their decision backfires, and they have to rethink their entire plan.

Some argue that you can’t teach good writing skills. We beg to differ. If the writer is curious, diligent and willing to learn about human nature, then they can create unique screenplays. Then, the technique and skills will eventually follow.

 

Source: http://newswire.net/newsroom/blog-post/00099401-how-to-make-your-screenplay-unique.html